Duchamp the bride stripped bare-The Bride Stripped Bare By Her Bachelors, Even [Marcel Duchamp] | Sartle - Rogue Art History

As a twenty-seven-year-old newcomer to New York, in he began to work on this masterpiece, having first conceived of it three years earlier while sojourning in Munich. Each element of the Glass is the result of meticulous studies, calculations, and experiments. In he published ninety-four of these notes in The Green Box , which suggest possible readings of the imagery of the Glass , and document in painstaking detail the complex interactions and erotic tension between the enigmatic bride in the upper panel and her nine uniformed bachelors below. Ten years would pass before Duchamp repaired the glass fragments, laboriously securing them between new panes and housing the fabrication in an aluminum frame. Satisfied with the result and the appearance of the eerily symmetrical cracks in the upper and lower sections of the work, he declared it finished.

Duchamp the bride stripped bare

Duchamp the bride stripped bare

Duchamp the bride stripped bare

Duchamp the bride stripped bare

The notes describe that his "hilarious picture" is Ducnamp to depict the erotic encounter between the "Bride", in the upper panel, and her nine "Bachelors" gathered timidly below in an abundance of mysterious mechanical apparatus in the lower panel. It consists of many geometric shapes melding together to create large mechanical objects, which seem to almost pop out from the Duchamp the bride stripped bare and ever-changing background. Dubbed The Green Boxthis 'explanatory work' has been described as "No less ambiguously or freely interpretable than [ The Large Glass ] itself Every visual element of the Glass is the result of meticulous studies, calculations, and experiments. Marcel Duchamp Fountainreplica In Duchamp declared the Glass "definitively unfinished. We would like to hear from you. Richard Hamilton had already been an admirer and friend of Duchamp's for some years.

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Rudolf Ernst Kuenzli, Francis M. Duchamp had sgripped two studies on glass for parts of the composition ths, 'Water Mill within Glider in neighbouring metals ' and 'Nine Malic Moulds', and gave permission for these studies to be repeated for the reconstruction and as a means of gaining experience in handling the medium. You can see both, along with Nude Descending a Staircase Duchamp the bride stripped bare. The origin of the name Dada is unclear; some believe that it is a nonsensical word. The bottom is prickly-looking circle with a small hole in the middle, consisting of outward spiraling lines. It is also surrounded by his other works — both paintings and "readymades" — which form a background which the work otherwise is bdide. This international movement was begun by a group of artists and poets associated with the Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich. He Dadies naked invited to lecture on art and to participate in formal discussions, as well as sitting Duchamp the bride stripped bare interviews with major publications. The damage was not discovered until the case was opened several thw later and the work was eventually repaired in by Duchamp himself, who secured the pieces between two sheets of heavier plate glass clamped together by a metal frame. Duchamp felt that the two studies for the 'Sieves' and the 'Oculist Witnesses' were new and, at his suggestion, thw were published by the Petersburg Press in editions of Viva dating sites, signed jointly by Hamilton and himself. The Bride's Domain upper half of the Glass : 1 Bride.

Duchamp worked on the piece from to , creating two panes of glass with materials such as lead foil, fuse wire, and dust.

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  • You might know Marcel Duchamp because of his Fountain— the urinal that he signed as R.
  • As a twenty-seven-year-old newcomer to New York, in he began to work on this masterpiece, having first conceived of it three years earlier while sojourning in Munich.

As a twenty-seven-year-old newcomer to New York, in he began to work on this masterpiece, having first conceived of it three years earlier while sojourning in Munich. Each element of the Glass is the result of meticulous studies, calculations, and experiments.

In he published ninety-four of these notes in The Green Box , which suggest possible readings of the imagery of the Glass , and document in painstaking detail the complex interactions and erotic tension between the enigmatic bride in the upper panel and her nine uniformed bachelors below.

Ten years would pass before Duchamp repaired the glass fragments, laboriously securing them between new panes and housing the fabrication in an aluminum frame. Satisfied with the result and the appearance of the eerily symmetrical cracks in the upper and lower sections of the work, he declared it finished. Occupying the space in the Museum chosen by the artist a half-century ago, The Large Glass has become the subject of extensive scholarship, and the object of pilgrimages for countless visitors drawn to its witty, intelligent, and vastly liberating redefinition of what a work of art can be.

Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art, , pp. Duchamp's Large Glass is as radical in appearance as in its intentions and implications. A work of art to be looked both through and at, neither a painting nor a sculpture, Duchamp called the Glass "a hilarious picture" but took it seriously enough to devote eight years to its making. He began work on his magnum opus as a twenty-seven-year-old newcomer to New York, having had it in mind since The Glass could not appear more different from the Readymades contemporary to it: complicated to manufacture, replete with narrative, and deeply entangled with art and science.

The Glass is also closely involved with words; Duchamp prepared a voluminous body of notes that articulate the narrative described by the full title of the Glass. He published ninety-four of these notes in individual facsimiles in in The Green Box , and they permit a tentative reading of the imagery of the Glass. As described in his notes, Duchamp's "delay in glass" chronicles the state of perpetual desire involving the bride, depicted in the upper panel, and the circle of nine uniformed bachelors arrayed in the lower.

Duchamp devised an elaborate iconography to demonstrate the erotic proceedings and characterize the unfortunate actors. Every visual element of the Glass is the result of meticulous studies, calculations, and experiments.

In Duchamp declared the Glass "definitively unfinished. That occurred by chance when the two panels were shattered while the Glass was in transit following an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum in — Duchamp laboriously glued it back together ten years later, securing the original glass between new panes and housing it in an aluminum frame.

Occupying the spot in the Philadelphia Museum chosen for it by Duchamp a half-century ago, the Glass continues to generate endless speculation and inspiration for followers of its enigmatic, amusing, and irresistibly compelling tale. Pardon our dust while we update this corner of the website. A larger image is unavailable for this object due to copyright, trademark or related rights.

Dreier, Social Tags [? Please check your spelling. Explore the Collections Country of Origin. Surely one of the most enigmatic works of art in any museum, The Large Glass dominates a gallery devoted to Marcel Duchamp's work from the exact location in which he placed it in Painstakingly executed on two planes of glass with unconventional materials such as lead foil, fuse wire, and dust, the appearance of the Glass is the result of an extraordinary combination of chance procedures, carefully plotted perspective studies, and laborious craftsmanship.

As for its metaphysical aspect, Duchamp's voluminous preparatory notes, published in , reveal that his "hilarious picture" is intended to diagram the erratic progress of an encounter between the "Bride," in the upper panel, and her nine "Bachelors" gathered timidly below amidst a wealth of mysterious mechanical apparatus.

Exhibited only once in at the Brooklyn Museum before it was accidentally broken and laboriously repaired by the artist the Glass joined the Museum's collection in and has gradually become the subject of a vast scholarly literature and the object of pilgrimages for countless visitors drawn to its witty, intelligent, and vastly liberating redefinition of what a work of art can be.

Prompted by a full size photographic copy on film for a BBC programme on Duchamp, Hamilton had, that same year, thought about the possibility of making a replica. As it was impossible to borrow the original because of its fragility and as it seemed unsatisfactory to make do with photographs, Hamilton decided that he would like to make a full-scale reconstruction if the costs could be met. On display at Tate Modern part of Materials and Objects. A little below that are three circular images tilted away from the viewer. And when I wanted to work on it I did, and other times I would go out and enjoy America. When he was later asked about what had influenced him at the time, Duchamp cited the work of Symbolist painter Odilon Redon , whose approach to art was not outwardly anti-academic, but quietly individual. While his contemporaries were achieving spectacular success in the art world by selling their works to high-society collectors, Duchamp observed, "I am still a victim of chess.

Duchamp the bride stripped bare

Duchamp the bride stripped bare

Duchamp the bride stripped bare

Duchamp the bride stripped bare. Main menu additional

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License this image. In carrying out this reconstruction of The Large Glass , Richard Hamilton deliberately avoided making a copy that acknowledged its fifty years of ageing and deterioration. Instead he set out to make it as it was conceived, accepting that it would similarly change to some extent with the passage of time. By doing this, thirteen years of work were compressed into nearly as many months. Does this text contain inaccurate information or language that you feel we should improve or change?

We would like to hear from you. Read more. Marcel Duchamp and Richard Hamilton born Steefel, Jr. Marcel Duchamp began to make 'The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even' or the 'Large Glass', as it is often known in New York in September and continued to work on it at intervals until he set out for a trip to Europe in February , when he pronounced it definitively unfinished. It was bought by Walter C. Arensberg in , but on moving to Los Angeles in he sold it to Katherine S.

Dreier so that it could remain in New York and Duchamp could continue to work on it. In it was shattered while returning from its first exhibition, the International Exhibition of Modern Art at the Brooklyn Museum.

The damage was not discovered until the case was opened several years later and the work was eventually repaired in by Duchamp himself, who secured the pieces between two sheets of heavier plate glass clamped together by a metal frame.

Although the 'Large Glass' was not begun until , most of Duchamp's work from mid onwards was concerned with research and studies for various sections of the Glass, including the 'Bride' of , the 'Chocolate Grinder', the 'Glider' and the 'Nine Malic Moulds' of , and the second version of the 'Chocolate Grinder' of Then in he published 94 documents relating to it as loose-leaf items in random order in a flat case The Green Box , including photographs , drawings and manuscript notes covering the period and later.

A further 79 notes were published in The White Box. Despite their random arrangement, and their elliptical and often enigmatic character, these documents are of crucial importance for the understanding of the Glass as they serve to identify the different elements, and to throw light on their interrelationship and on the meaning of the whole. Any attempt to summarise this commentary in a few words would be grossly misleading, but what can be said is that the Glass is divided horizontally into two parts, with the female section the Bride's Domain at the top and the male section the Bachelor Apparatus below, and that it constitutes a diagram of an ironic love-making machine of extraordinary complexity in which the male and female machines communicate only by means of two circulatory systems, and without any point of contact.

In addition some have seen in it references to alchemy, the Tarot cards, Christian symbolism, and also a preoccupation with perspective and the fourth dimension.

A list of some of the many books and articles relating to it is given in the first part of the bibliography. The idea of making this reconstruction came from Richard Hamilton, who had been asked by the Arts Council to organise a major retrospective exhibition of Marcel Duchamp's work to be held at the Tate Gallery in June-July As it was impossible to borrow the original because of its fragility and as it seemed unsatisfactory to make do with photographs, Hamilton decided that he would like to make a full-scale reconstruction if the costs could be met.

The Tate Gallery Trustees felt that they could not make payments towards the cost of a work which did not yet exist, so he went to New York and contacted William N. Copley, who was a friend of Duchamp and himself. He said that he would like to have it and agreed to pay a sum to cover the cost of the materials and, at Hamilton's suggestion, to give Duchamp an equal amount as a fee.

Richard Hamilton had already been an admirer and friend of Duchamp's for some years. His interest in Duchamp went back to or when he saw the Green Box at Roland Penrose's, then in he wrote to him and suggested making a typographical version of it. They met for the first time about Duchamp put him in touch with the American art historian George Heard Hamilton, who was interested in the same project; and the book, translated by George Heard Hamilton and with typographical lay-out by Richard Hamilton, was published in with a dedication to William N.

Copley and his wife. Ulf Linde's version was made from photographs of the original, which Linde himself had never seen, and is inaccurate in certain respects.

Prompted by a full size photographic copy on film for a BBC programme on Duchamp, Hamilton had, that same year, thought about the possibility of making a replica. However he decided in that he would make a reconstruction not by working from photographs but by using the detailed documentation in the Green Box to retrace the various stages which led up to the production of the original work.

The first step was to make a full-size perspective drawing from the given dimensions in the plan and elevation and other Green Box notes for the lower part of the Glass, in the hope of producing a drawing similar to the one which once existed on the plaster wall of Duchamp's studio in Paris, but which has since been destroyed.

To produce this he found it necessary to do dozens of other perspective studies and to work with threads, using the vanishing points to establish the perspective construction. References were made to the original Glass more to gain knowledge of the construction of subject matter than to copy delineations on the surface of the original.

Slight differences in perspective were accepted to maintain an integrity in the reconstruction equalling that of the original. Tracings were made, from the new perspective, of each of the elements with key lines added to relate them to each other. These tracings, reversed, were attached to the front of the glass to give the positioning of lead wire, formed to the drawing, then cemented to the back of the glass with mastic varnish.

Duchamp had made two studies on glass for parts of the composition , 'Water Mill within Glider in neighbouring metals ' and 'Nine Malic Moulds', and gave permission for these studies to be repeated for the reconstruction and as a means of gaining experience in handling the medium.

In addition, Hamilton made two further studies not found necessary by Duchamp: a small glass of the 'Sieves', trying out a specified dust raising process, and another of the 'Oculist Witnesses'.

The 'Oculist Witnesses', unlike the rest of the Glass, demanded a technique not used by Duchamp. The right-hand area of the lower glass had been silvered on the back and a drawing transferred to the silver by Duchamp through a piece of carbon paper. The silvering was then scraped away up to the drawn lines leaving the brilliantly reflective image. The long process was shortened in the remake by means of a silk-screen made from a blocked-in redrawing of the carbon paper.

Pigment screened on to the mirror formed a resist which allowed the redundant silver to be etched away. Duchamp felt that the two studies for the 'Sieves' and the 'Oculist Witnesses' were new and, at his suggestion, they were published by the Petersburg Press in editions of 50, signed jointly by Hamilton and himself.

The upper half of the Glass is less precise in its drawing; 'Bride' and 'Blossoming' are free organic constructions. The outlines in these cases were taken from photographs. The 'Shots', nine holes drilled at spots located by projecting a paint-dipped match from a toy cannon, were plotted from the Philadelphia Glass in accordance with notes and measurements taken by a research graduate who went to the USA to check these and other measurements, to examine Duchamp's handling of the wire, and to make certain colour notes.

In carrying out this reconstruction Hamilton deliberately avoided making a copy of the present appearance of the Glass and reproducing the severe deterioration which has occurred, partly as a result of the fragmentation of the glass itself.

Instead he set out to make the glass as it was conceived, accepting that it would likewise change to some extent with the passage of time. Unlike the original, however, it will never crack, as it is made of Armourplate glass.

The reconstruction took exactly a year to make. When Marcel Duchamp came to London for the opening of his exhibition, he agreed to sign it and inscribed it on the back 'Richard Hamilton pour copie conforme Marcel Duchamp '. The Bride's Domain upper half of the Glass : 1 Bride. Bryony Bery. Jennifer Mundy. George Baker , T.

Main menu additional Become a Member Shop. Twitter Facebook Email Pinterest Share this page. Not on display. Artist Marcel Duchamp — Medium Oil, lead, dust and varnish on glass.

Dimensions Object: x mm. Collection Tate. Acquisition Presented by William N. Copley through the American Federation of Arts Reference T Display caption Catalogue entry. Display caption In carrying out this reconstruction of The Large Glass , Richard Hamilton deliberately avoided making a copy that acknowledged its fifty years of ageing and deterioration. Gallery label, June Does this text contain inaccurate information or language that you feel we should improve or change?

Tate Papers. Tate Etc. Tate Papers no. You might like Left Right. Marcel Duchamp Fountain , replica On display at Tate Modern part of Materials and Objects. Marcel Duchamp Fresh Widow , replica Marcel Duchamp Coffee Mill Francis Picabia The Fig-Leaf Othon Friesz Woman at a Window Jean Fautrier Large Tragic Head Jean Dubuffet Large Black Landscape Marcel Duchamp Female Fig Leaf , cast Jean Fautrier Head of a Hostage —4. On display at Tate Liverpool part of Constellations.

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Duchamp the bride stripped bare