Vintage stark voltage amps instrument-Vintage Test Equipment

In fact, a handheld meter is often the first piece of test equipment most of us acquire. Today the majority of handheld meters sold have a digital display. However, meters manufactured up until the s had an analog readout. It was up to the operator to properly read the position of a needle on an analog scale. Digital readouts did not appear until the s and digital displays small enough for handheld use were not widely available until the s.

Vintage stark voltage amps instrument

DayRad Another test unit Salman butt cricketer know nothing about. Please login to comment on the article. Return or exchange if product is defective on arrival. This will tell you the full-power amperes that the amp is expected to draw. Also known as OQ-3 in the Military version. Unlike many of today's digital meters that warn the operator of intrument protect the meter from incorrect hookups, early analog meter movements were often damaged by reversed or incorrectly connected leads.

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If the lamp in the window glows, reverse the plug. Just ammps to learn another Vintage stark voltage amps instrument of the guitar and amp world. The signal tracer has a compartment in the left side for the probe storage. Following is my favorite as it has two quantity 3-prong electrical outputs and a visual meter for status: [Broken link] Amp Maniac is beginning to be popular. Messages: 4, ByDobro and National began selling combo amps for Hawaiian guitar. More Information. A guitar amplifier or amp is an electronic device or system that strengthens the weak electrical signal from a pickup on an electric guitarModels needed in atlanta guitaror acoustic guitar so that it can produce sound through one or more loudspeakerswhich are typically housed in a wooden cabinet. The "power soak" approach places the attenuation between the power tubes and the guitar speaker. Absorption Frequency Meters These hand held absorption frequency meters are used to measure the frequency of an oscillator or find harmonics. For electric guitar amplifiers, there is often [ vague ] a distinction between "practice" or "recording studio" guitar amps, with output power ratings of less than one watt to 20 watts, and "performance" or "stage" amps of 30 watts or higher. A guitar amp is an electronic amplifier that Vintage stark voltage amps instrument by increasing the signal of Vintagee electric or acoustic guitar so that it can produce sound through a loudspeaker. Tested tubes in and out of the radio circuit. Some describe speakers wired in series usually no more than two as sounding " The simplest guitar amplifiers, such as some vintage amps and modern instruent amps, have only a single volume control.

Most of the older amps in use were designed at a time when the AC power out of the socket was lower.

  • I'd like to get my vintage amps' power down to v to v that they'e designed for.
  • Test Equipment Collection Vintage test equipment in my collection from the s through the s.
  • Discussion in ' Amps and Cabs ' started by Santuzzo , Apr 1,

Vintage Test Equipment. National CRM. Uses a 1" CRT for display. This line of National scopes were intended for use by radio operators, they were used to monitor modulation and have only minimal components as shown in schematic. Time base for horizontal sweep was derived from the AC power line at a 60 cycle rate or an from external signal. National CRU.

National CRU-P. This 2" National is identical to the Model CRU shown above, except that the front panel is laid out horizontally. National CRR? Not really sure if it is a National piece or a copy.

It has no ID plate or markings anywhere, other than the engraved knob labels on the panel. National CRO. The set weighs in at about 11 lbs.

As in the other National 'scopes this one was used mainly for checking modulation levels in HAM transmitters. RCA Model These prices included tubes, see ad here. Uses a 2" 2AP1 for display. This model is identical to the model except that a 2AP1 CRT was shoehorned into the box, the tube had to be installed at an upward angle to fit in the shallow cabinet.

Inside chassis view of the RCA oscillograph. Typical of most 's oscilloscopes, this uses a as the horizontal sweep generator, 6C6's for the horizontal and vertical amplifiers and an 80 rectifier. Deforest's Training Inc. This scope was used as part of a training course. Possibly from the original DeVry Institute which was started in as the DeForest Training School, as the name on the unit doesn't quite match, I can't say for sure.

No cabinet, click here for a side view. UTL Model E. This scope was used as a training project for students enrolled in the United Television Laboratories School.

By the 's they were gone. The cabinet is home made, it uses a 2" 2AP1 CRT, has vertical and horizontal amplifiers, and linear sweep generator. Uses a 1" CRT, probably dates from the 30's. Direct connection to the deflection plates, probably used in a HAM shack as modulation monitor. Well constructed cabinet made up of 7 pieces all screwed together. Circuitry very similar to the National CRM above.

It is very crudely built as can be seen in the photograph below. It is a true scope as it has a tube to generate the linear sweep. Supreme Model Typical of early Supreme equipment, this is housed in a dovetailed, quartersawn oak cabinet.

Very primitive set, has only 2 tubes, besides the CRT. A 5T4 rectifier and a 6J7 vertical amplifier. Sweep is either external or internal 60cycle Supreme Model This updated model has vertical and horizontal amplifiers, and a real horizontal sweep generated by a tube. Uses a 3" CRT for display. Typical of early Supreme equipment, this is housed in a dovetailed, quartersawn oak cabinet, brushed brass art-deco front panel and a highly nickel plated chassis shown below.

This early version dates from around Uses a 3" CRT. Supreme Model A. A later version of the Model line of scopes, electrically it is identical to the earlier versions. This model has a metal cabinet and the chassis is painted wrinkle black. This device was called a "Complete Dynamic Analyzer", it consisted of a oscillograph, vacuum tube voltmeter, dynamic signal tracer, multimeter, and a wave meter all in one 35 lb.

Philco Model This set is very similar to the Waterman scope. Click here to see ad. This CRT is very short about the same as a 2AP1, this allows the 3" scope to be housed in a case not much deeper than the Model shown above. This set is from the early 's. It is an updated version of the WOA produced in Clough-Brengle Model This set uses a 3" CRT for display. This is very similar to the Model A shown below. This model was produced in late , see packing list.

Uses a 1" CRT. Clough-Brengle Model A. The is the same as the except it has a P5 phosphor. This is a blue trace with a very fast decay time used for photography applications. Inside view of the scope. Unusual construction is used in this set, instead of the components installed on a standard chassis, the parts are attached directly to the cabinet.

This set has been restored. Blue trace of the P5 phosphor. Circa late 40's early 50's This is a 2-terminal diode curve tracer. I believe it was made in the model shop at Raytheon, as it came in a lot with other items from them. Not really sure how it operates, it has two test fixtures one labeled "static" the other "dynamic". This is the only display I can get with a diode connected to the dynamic fixture.

DuMont Model The internal components have been coated with a sealer, typical of what you find in military gear that was to be used in areas of high humidity. A label dates that the coating was applied in August DayRad In addition to being a general purpose oscilloscope this unit contains a wobbulator, a motor driven sweep generator, to do sweep alignment of equipment.

Bendix Model The center frequency can be shifted up or down by connecting a signal generator to the bottom terminal posts and tuning it to the desired center frequency. Close up of the CRT mount showing the sweep graticle. For the operators manual click here. I did find a mention of this tube used in a high speed display unit used by NASA for radio astronomy. Close up of the 5 electron guns The dual set of pins on base. Size comparison, the tube in front is a 3AP1. Weston Model Also known as OQ-3 in the Military version.

To test tubes, individual jumpers are connected between the tube socket panel and the tester panel Weston Model OD This is the military version of the Weston Connect the tube elements to the tester is by short jumpers between the panels and then setting the voltage requirements for each element. One of the counter top testers of the early 30's. The large 9" diameter meter allowed the customer to see how bad his radio tubes were and he needed to purchase Silvertone tubes for his radio.

This early 30's counter top tester sports an 8" diameter meter for test results. The other meters are used to adjust line voltage and set operating point for the tube under test. You first plug the tube into one of the sockets on the left side of the tester to check for shorts, if there is a short the white circle to the left of the meter lights up with the word "SHORT". If the tube has no shorts then you plug the tube into one of the sockets on the right side to check for quality.

Apparently it is capable of testing Kellog type tubes with the filaments brought out on a top cap. Triplett Model No other markings are on this small tester, the tube chart located on the "step" is so small you need a magnifying glass to read the tube settings. Test setup is done with jumpers. Radio City Products Model The meter is in upside down, that's the way I got it.

I ended up having to replace them more than once kept happening thinking it was a bad run of tubes. In the s, musicians began to experiment with distortion by overdriving guitar amps. Most Active Authors Latest Reviews. Since the early s, it has become increasingly common for acoustic amplifiers to provide a range of digital effects, such as reverb and compression. In , the Stromberg-Voisinet firm was the first company to sell an electric stringed instrument and amplifier package. This tester was AC powered. It uses the same style of parts as the SG Tube Tester.

Vintage stark voltage amps instrument

Vintage stark voltage amps instrument

Vintage stark voltage amps instrument

Vintage stark voltage amps instrument

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What's It Worth: Vintage Handheld Meters - Electronic Products

Most of the older amps in use were designed at a time when the AC power out of the socket was lower. Over the years, the nominal AC voltage rating has crept up; was "standard" for a while, then came , Now many cities have AC that is most commonly or so. We certainly do here in Austin. AC voltage can run even higher at times when the average load on the power net drops off - like in the early evening in spring and fall when all those air conditioners cycle off.

Obviously, most amps will survive life with higher input voltages - they have and do - but it's not necessarily good for them or you, either from the standpoint of repairs costs or tone. This steady overvoltage can cause your power filter caps to wear out sooner, make tubes die sooner from the higher filament voltage, in general cook things from the extra heat the parts will dissipate. Variacs are one way to correct this, but these things are huge, heavy, and carry the temptation to twiddle the voltage just a - little - bit more to see what it would sound like.

I looked up variacs in a Mouser Electronics catalog now. The cheapest already-boxed up variac they list is a 5A unit. Assuming that sounds OK, you're going to pay for and haul around this thing.

You set up at a gig, measure the AC line voltage, set the variac to give you VAC just like your vintage AC needs, and play a thunderous set. You take a break and while you're away, the bass player takes a gander at your new tone-toy, fiddles with the knob, but sees you coming back and leaps away from it so you won't know he messed with it - and accidentally turns the knob up to the V maximum.

You don't know he touched it - he gets away scot-free - but when you flick it off standby and start into the new set, the amp begins to sound a little funny and some smoke curls delicately out the back A handier and less potentially dangerous way to do this for your amp is to put together an AC line voltage corrector.

It's not a panacea for bad tone, but it will let your amp work on the power it was designed for in a quick, easy to set up way and may save a set of tubes or an output transformer.

To do this, look at your amp's power rating plate, usually on the back of the chassis. This will tell you the full-power amperes that the amp is expected to draw. Find a low voltage transformer that is rated for at least that many amperes and a voltage that is the difference between the nominal AC power voltage in your town and the rated voltage on your amp, or at least close. Wire this transformer up so that the AC line connects to the primary, and the secondary is connected with one end to the end of the primary that is attached to the "hot" side of the AC line.

The output of the thing is taken from the "cold" side of the AC line and the free end of the secondary. The secondary adds to or subtracts from the existing AC line voltage depending on which way round the secondary is connected to the primary.

If you wire it to subtract, the AC power to your amp back to about what it was designed to use. As I mentioned, there are two ways to connect the secondary. One way, and the voltage between the free end of the secondary and the "neutral" side of the AC line will be the primary line voltage plus the transformer secondary voltage. The other way round, the voltage will be the primary line voltage minus the transformer secondary voltage, which is what you want. Looking at the schematic, the little dots by the transformer windings indicate phasing.

The dots indicate ends of a winding which move positive and then negative - it's AC! In the top circuit of the illustration, I've shown a way to connect a common 12VCT filament transformer. The primary of the transformer is connected across the incoming AC line. The dotted end of the winding is connected to the "hot" or "line" side of the power line. This causes a voltage to appear across the secondary. With the two dotted ends connected as shown, when the AC line voltage at the dotted end of the primary moves up with respect to the neutral side, the dotted end of the secondary also moves up compared to the non-dotted end of the secondary.

However, with the dotted end of the secondary connected to the dotted end of the primary, the non-dotted end of the secondary moves down compared to the dotted end of the primary. Therefore, at any time, when the two dotted ends are connected, the voltage from the non-dotted end of the secondary to the non-dotted end of the primary is less than the voltage across the primary by exactly the voltage of the secondary.

In the picture shown, with a VAC on the input line coming in and a 6V secondary, the AC voltage between the free end of the secondary and the line neutral is Vac - 6Vac or Vac. If we used a 12Vac secondary, it would be VacVac or Vac. Got all that dotting down? OK - here's the rub : transformer makers don't mark the dotted ends of the windings on power transformers!

You have to figure that out by connecting up the windings and measuring the output. It's correct when you get a lower voltage than you started with or higher if that's what you wanted to do - I don't advise doing that, though.

There are tests you can do with batteries and meters and things, but the cut-and-try is faster and easier. Just be careful - this is the AC line voltage you're playing with here. If you can't connect the thing to do the measurements safely, don't try it!

Most of the wiring can be done with wire nuts, as in house wiring. If you get a fuse holder and AC socket with pigtails attached, it can all be done with wire nuts. If you work cleanly, you can probably mount this in the bottom of a combo amp. If you decide to make one of these, be very careful about the safety aspects. You will be working with AC line voltages, which can kill you.

Do not try this unless you already know how to do primary AC wiring safely. This note does not tell you how to do that. Do not skimp on the housing, line cord, strain relief for the line cord, fuse holder, or AC socket, and be certain that safety ground is connected to the housing and to the secondary AC socket.

Note that ALL of the wiring in this power correction box with the exception of the safety ground is connected to the AC primary power, and so is hazardous. The secondary of the transformer, which would normally be isolated from the power line is also hot by virtue of its connection to the AC line. If you don't have any idea what the proper precautions are but still want one, have a tech wire one up for you. It's not worth your amp - or your life. If you're clever, you noticed that you could get a transformer with a couple or more voltages and switch select the amount of cut, and or boost.

A multitap secondary transformer can give you several steps of lower or higher voltages as shown in the second circuit. With one end of the centertapped secondary connected to the dotted side of the AC line, you have a choice of full line voltage, line voltage -6V, or line voltage minus 12V.

Vintage stark voltage amps instrument

Vintage stark voltage amps instrument