Marie weil case management model options-Case Management in Human Service Practice - Marie Weil, James M. Karls - Google Книги

Forgot your login information? Subject: Social Work Practice general. The Handbook of Community Practice is the first volume in this field, encompassing community development, organizing, planning, and social change, and the first community practice text that provides in-depth treatment of globalization—including its impact on communities in the United States and in international development work. Weil, M. Ohmer The Handbook of Community Practice.

Marie weil case management model options

Marie weil case management model options

Marie weil case management model options

Marie weil case management model options

Marie weil case management model options

London : Palgrave. Therefore, we have categorized the Chicago program according to these three specializations. While leadership is surely a cardinal component of macro practice, it is interesting to note the rapid increase in the use of the term and somewhat problematic to identify specifically what content is being taught without examination of course syllabi. Table A. What wdil VitalSource eBooks? Related Articles about About Related Articles close popup. Subsequent editions were published in and A total of out of of the programs responding to the survey offer one of these concentrations. Swinger house party maine subscribe or login.

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Newfoundland and Labrador St. Online version: Weil, Marie, Case management in human service practice. One example of this is how case managers in a large metropolitan area were able to link HIV-infected clients with at least two referrals during the initial session to agencies or services that would provide ongoing services. Yukon Territory. Marie weil case management model options contexts call for different approaches to case management. Children and the Child Welfare System -- 6. National Alliance for Direct Support Professionals. Herman, D. No credit card required. Social work administration -- United States. Clinical Case Management Clinical approaches to case management combine managment acquisition case management and clinical therapy Vulva pissing. Housing First How many people are homeless in Canada? Cite Citation.

Welcome to CRCPress.

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  • Case management has been around since the 19th century and has evolved into a broad and complex set of practices used in healthcare, social work, and a myriad of related fields.
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  • A thorough grounding in case management principles and techniques that gives human services professionals the tools to administer case management for improved provision of services.
  • A case manager helps individuals and families meet their comprehensive health needs by advocating for them and coordinating appropriate care.

Forgot your login information? Marie Weil , Dorothy N. In: The Handbook of Community Practice. Subject: Social Work Practice general. Weil, M. Evolution, models, and the changing context of community practice.

Ohmer The handbook of community practice pp. Weil, Marie, Dorothy N. Gamble and Mary L. Weil, Marie, et al. SAGE Knowledge. Have you created a personal profile? Login or create a profile so that you can create alerts and save clips, playlists, and searches. Please log in from an authenticated institution or log into your member profile to access the email feature. CQ Press Your definitive resource for politics, policy and people.

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Intensive Case Management Intensive case management ICM provides assertive outreach and counseling services , including skills-building, family consultations and crisis intervention, according to the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs. Don't have an account? Data Import. No credit card required. The clinical case manager is also well-positioned to help the client address social, emotional, and mental barriers to services. Verify your information A verification code has been sent to the phone you specified.

Marie weil case management model options

Marie weil case management model options

Marie weil case management model options. Find a copy in the library

Like a clinical case management model, the strengths-based case management model recognizes the value of community services, family, and cross-agency partnerships. It encourages the client to build and nurture informal support networks alongside identifying and accessing formal community services and institutional resources.

It encourages the client to take the lead in identifying their own needs, take control over the search for resources and services to address those needs, and view the community as a resource instead of a barrier to success instead. Strengths-based clinical case management models involve outreach, clinical services, advocacy, and robust coordination between case managers and clients.

Implementing a program based on this model requires that organizations and agencies support case managers with a robust case management system that can track highly individualized services and capture complex data and metrics. Besides understanding the differences between case management models, you should also understand the tools and infrastructure needed to support case managers.

Which case management model your organization uses will likely affect your database and the outcomes you track. These insights are critical when optimizing a program for outcomes. ETO and Apricot save frontline staff time, make reporting easy, and surface important insight on client progress. All of this ultimately allows case managers to have more impact on their clients. Our software solutions empower nonprofits through case management, data management, and outcomes tracking.

Reporting happens in real time so that you can monitor results and be responsive when it matters. With Apricot, your data is right at your fingertips in a cloud-based solution that gives your organization freedom from paper files, spreadsheets, local hardware, and monthly maintenance downtimes. Apricot is hosted on a best-in-class Amazon Web Services AWS environment so your data is secure, backed up, and compliant. User-based permissions and audit trails further enable secure access to data.

Apricot allows you to easily track volunteers as well as clients. Utilize guest user modules and webforms to further engage your constituents. Apricot allows you to track clients, volunteers, services, and more. In a moment you will automatically be redirected to your new Apricot Trial.

Please get in touch with us at to get a trial in your country. By submitting this form, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. A verification code has been sent to the phone you specified. Please verify your identity by entering the 6-digit code you were sent. Social Solutions Blog The Brokerage Case Management Model The brokerage model is a very brief approach to case management in which case workers attempt to help clients identify their needs and broker supportive services in one or two contacts.

Tags case management models case management software nonprofit software. Software for Every Nonprofit Our software solutions empower nonprofits through case management, data management, and outcomes tracking. Thank you for reaching out! Our team will be in touch soon. Did you know? Creating your Free Trial No credit card required. First Name. Last Name. Organization name organization name not available.

Business e-mail. Country -- US Other. Start Free Trial. One example of this is how case managers in a large metropolitan area were able to link HIV-infected clients with at least two referrals during the initial session to agencies or services that would provide ongoing services. Case managers working with substance-abusing clients in a large metropolitan area had access to funds and were able to purchase treatment services, drastically reducing waiting periods.

Clinical approaches to case management combine resource acquisition case management and clinical therapy activities. Clinical and rehabilitation approaches are often combined, as some case managers provide activities like psychotherapy and teaching specific skills so that one treatment professional provides, or at least coordinates, therapy and case management activities.

The approaches are common in substance abuse treatment programs. Driven by staffing considerations, having one treatment professional provide all services to clients is more economical than separating clinical and case management services, SAMHSA says.

A program for women who have substance abuse problems used the clinical case management approach due to the belief that women have special needs in the treatment setting. The program holds that these needs are most appropriately addressed through a therapeutic relationship with one caregiver. Case managers play a pivotal role for their clients, helping them receive the care and resources they need. They do this in a variety of environments, including hospitals, mental health clinics, crisis centers, legal advocacy organizations, welfare agencies and schools.

They also often complete an internship at a clinic or agency before obtaining full-time employment. Graduates gain the knowledge and skills to enter fields like case management. It can be completed in as little as 16 months, is priced substantially below most degree completion programs and is taught by outstanding and understanding faculty who are geared toward teaching adults. Grace College Online Education News. Intensive Case Management Intensive case management ICM provides assertive outreach and counseling services , including skills-building, family consultations and crisis intervention, according to the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.

ICM has been tested for assisting diverse substance-abusing populations, especially homeless and alcohol dependent persons, according to the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs.

SAGE Reference - Evolution, Models, and the Changing Context of Community Practice

Forgot your login information? Subject: Social Work Practice general. The Handbook of Community Practice is the first volume in this field, encompassing community development, organizing, planning, and social change, and the first community practice text that provides in-depth treatment of globalization—including its impact on communities in the United States and in international development work. Weil, M. Ohmer The Handbook of Community Practice. Weil, Marie, et al..

The Handbook of Community Practice. SAGE Knowledge. Have you created a personal profile? Login or create a profile so that you can create alerts and save clips, playlists, and searches. Please log in from an authenticated institution or log into your member profile to access the email feature.

To those current and future students who will carry on community practice—in work to foster social and economic development, in mutual work with people to improve the conditions and quality of their lives, to advance the profession's mission to press unwaveringly for human rights, and to work always toward social justice. View Copyright Page. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Community-based social services, 2. Community organization. Community development. Community psychology. Weil, Marie II. Reisch, Michael III. Ohmer, Mary L. Community practice has been an integral part of social work since its inception in the Settlement House Movement and Charity Organization Societies in the Global North in response to pressures caused by the Industrial Revolution.

In the Global South, community practice as a formal process typically began in reaction to the pressures of colonization and efforts to rebuild communities and societies in its wake. Across both hemispheres, community practice—in its grassroots organizing, interagency planning, and social justice aspects—engages citizens in problem-solving work to improve quality of life for vulnerable groups and communities and enacts the profession's social justice mission through a variety of practice models, from community development to political action.

While practice emphases varied in many nations over the course of the 20th century—sometimes with greater focus on organizing services, grassroots organizing, planning, or social action—the essential purposes of strengthening communities and services and pressing for access, equality, empowerment, and social justice have not wavered. Indeed, community practice is expanding globally in the 21st century.

At the same time, major new contexts are developing that will impact community practice work everywhere: the increasing interaction of multiple cultures within and among nations; the continuing struggle to make human rights for everyone—including women and children—a reality throughout the world; and the far-reaching impact of globalization on the poor and working classes in both the Global South and North.

Many practice strategies are likely to prove tried and true, others will need modifications for diverse settings or changing populations, and doubtless new strategies will be developed in the future as needed. All communities are and will continue to be affected by the global economy and by the social, economic, and political shifts that will continue interactively.

Community practitioners will need to be cognizant, proactive, and seriously engaged to bring forth close global connections that support human and sustainable development, rather than witnessing the increase of already-evident risks and damage to local economies, social structures, and the environment. Community practice approaches, from grassroots organizing to policy and social action, must take into account new complexities, challenges, and opportunities in this period of unparalleled global change.

Indeed, community practice is the critical component of the profession that can help citizens, groups, communities, and organizations enlarge civil society, increase grassroots political clout, advocate for human rights, and work for positive social change to support those most disadvantaged by macro changes.

This second edition of The Handbook of Community Practice has been reorganized and reworked, and many new chapters have been [Page xii] added to present a strong global perspective supported by knowledge, theory, and practice examples from the Global South and North.

This book is intended to assist current and future community practice, social work, and community development students, faculty, and practitioners in many parts of the world as they confront the challenges posed in the coming decades. It is also intended to help students in industrialized nations understand and recognize how much they have to learn from practice, theory, and knowledge developed in industrializing nations. There is much to be gained through mutual and egalitarian transnational learning, and while much more sharing, knowledge building, and research are needed, this handbook seeks to establish and encourage this transnational and mutual approach to learning and testing practice approaches.

I greatly appreciate the work of the authors for the first edition and particularly the writing and excellent initial editing of selected chapters by associate editors Michael Reisch, Dorothy N. Mulroy, and Ram A. The positive response to the book owes much to the quality of their work. Happily, SAGE has made the original edition of the handbook available online through libraries so that readers can continue to refer to it and faculty can access chapters for their classes.

Given the very positive reception of the first edition of this text and the need for such a community practice volume to provide greater focus on global issues and broader ranges of theory, practice, and knowledge, I was delighted when Kassie Graves, senior acquisitions editor for SAGE, proposed a second edition. Kassie has been unfailing in her encouragement and support of this work. One could not hope to work with a more knowledgeable and skilled editorial team than Kassie, Megan Granger, and Libby Larson.

Most especially, I am immensely appreciative of the creative chapter development and astute editing of Michael Reisch of the University of Maryland at Baltimore and Mary L. Ohmer of Georgia State University, who graciously consented to serve as associate editors for the second edition.

Their intellect, extensive knowledge, commitment, and editorial skill made them outstanding partners in the development of this text. They assisted in author selection, offered support in chapter planning, and reviewed and edited multiple drafts of numerous chapters for this edition, providing support for authors and excellent editorial skills. I extend heartfelt thanks to Mary and Michael for their work and to the contributors to the second edition, who expanded the concept of the book and deepened the knowledge, theory, and practice examples for students.

A total of 66 distinguished authors contributed to this second edition, with some involved in more than one chapter. With regard to multinational experience, 8 authors were born or now live in nations other than the United States. These authors all have experience working in multiple nations.

A number of authors from the United States have considerable experience in multinational practice, teaching, and research; at least 20 have been involved in international work, and 1 works full-time for an international nongovernmental organization.

While a number of the authors are university faculty, these are not ivory tower people. Almost all are involved in work with communities, groups, and organizations, or advocacy and policy practice.

Some are guiding comprehensive neighborhood initiatives. Several have developed research and study centers that tie them to communities in multiple [Page xiii] nations. One has developed a women's community organizing center that supports organizers in communication and collaborative work. Several have been called on to conduct research on asset development in multiple nations; a number have led study-abroad programs; several have taught in countries other than their own; some have been involved in multinational research for international organizations; and many have been involved in volunteer consultation for organizations in multiple countries.

They bring extensive knowledge and practice experience to their writing. To heighten the focus on the realities of practice, this second edition has added more practitioner authors who bring current, on-the-ground experience to vital areas of community practice.

Still others work as community organizers, advocates, and program and organizational consultants, and one is assistant to the president of a national U.

In addition to international representation, some of the diversity of the U. While a full survey has not been taken, the table below reflects some of the nations in which contributors to the book have worked or volunteered. This second edition has provided these contributors the opportunity to compose a comprehensive summary of their favorite subjects and practice areas.

In combination, the handbook builds strongly on the earlier literature on community practice and on theory and perspectives from multiple nations. Michael Reisch, Mary L. Ohmer, and I have worked to ensure that the second edition builds on the current literature and presents both the breadth and depth of community practice.

As a result, this volume provides unprecedented opportunities 1 to examine the range of practice methods employed currently in community interventions; 2 to consider the political, economic, social, and global shifts affecting and changing the context of practice across the world; 3 to explore theory and practice theorizing; and 4 to analyze ways in which knowledge, methodology, and research can provide direction and inform leaders, facilitators, community members, and practitioners about ways to strengthen communities and service systems as well as to organize, plan, and act for needed change.

Authors have critically examined knowledge, theory, practice, and methods, and have worked to define and interpret emerging issues that [Page xiv] future students, practitioners, scholars, and researchers will need to confront in coming years. The handbook is organized into six sections. Part I provides analysis of the contexts of community practice and presents central issues that impact the practitioner's work. Four new chapters introduce this edition. Chapter 1 examines global contexts and a range of issues facing community practitioners across the world.

Chapter 2 provides an overview of the complex history of community development, organizing, and planning in the United States. Chapter 3 analyzes challenges in the global economy for both the Global South and North, and Chapter 4 probes central issues and principles of social justice, human rights, and values that can assist community practitioners in determining courses of action. Two new theory chapters conclude this section: Chapter 5 analyzes theories of community and provides essential knowledge, and Chapter 6 explores types of theories that relate to and support practice, as well as central practice theories of development, organizing, planning, and social change.

Beginning with relevant explanatory theory, the process of theorizing, and the importance of applying critical perspectives, this chapter moves to examination of theory focused on scales of intervention—from interpersonal to inter-organizational—through which practitioners engage members of communities and organizations.

The chapter concludes with central practice theory for major methods of community practice and the process of moving theories into action. Part II begins with the evolution of practice models in Chapter 7 and specifically examines eight current models used in many parts of the world and adapted for local context and issues.

These models relate to organizing; community, social, economic, and sustainable development; program and service development; social planning, coalition building, political and social action, and policy practice; and movements for progressive change. Analysis of each model is provided, along with discussion of outcomes, change strategies, constituencies, and scope of concern as well as identification of major roles needed for effective practice in each model.

Chapter 8 presents a vital history of development theory and development work infused with knowledge and critical perspective from the Global South. It provides historical analysis of the outcomes of application of particular theories and carefully analyzes whose interests were met by dominant theories, some of which emerged in conjunction with colonial exploitation or followed colonialist ideologies.

Chapter 9 presents central issues of practice for sustainable development to promote progressive social and economic change and environmental protection of the earth for future generations.

Chapters 10 and 11 examine contemporary community organizing practice—one compares and contrasts conflict and consensus approaches, and the other provides examples and issues related to organizing in communities of color. Chapters 12 and 13 examine social planning, the first presenting theory and case examples of planning with communities and the second illustrating principles and examples of larger-scale planning in communities and cities, as well as particular issues related to planning for service development.

Both these chapters take a global perspective, providing examples from both the Global North and South. The next five chapters Chapters 14 — 18 examine practice to promote progressive social change. Chapter 14 addresses essential participatory methods that are adaptable to many practice settings and ground practice with those who have been marginalized.

Chapter 15 focuses on strategies for social, political, and legislative action. Chapter 16 skillfully differentiates radical community organizing from other types and illustrates the need for practitioners to employ strategies and tactics that address root causes of major social problems. The increasing importance and methods of practice in coalitions, collaborations, and partnerships are analyzed in Chapter 17 , along with illustrations of these central interorganizational practice approaches.

Chapter 18 analyzes eight models for engaging in policy practice—a central means of initiating and solidifying needed social change.

Part III engages readers in diverse issues, areas, and fields of community practice. The first two chapters in this section examine issues of diversity and multicultural communication in different ways: Chapter 19 explores what needs to happen for organizations to develop cultural competence for effective work with diverse groups and communities of color, while Chapter 20 analyzes issues related to multicultural communication and collaboration and documents the principles, skills, and practice strategies needed for effective cross-cultural communication.

The fields of practice discussed present issues and challenges in rural community practice Chapter 21 , in reviving social work's commitment to workplace justice Chapter 22 , and in the skills needed now for effective community economic development Chapter Chapter 24 examines social problems in major U. Chapter 25 demonstrates the development of a model children's service system and what is required to promote needed services in major urban areas.

Marie weil case management model options

Marie weil case management model options

Marie weil case management model options