Diet pills celebrity endorsers-Dietary Supplements | Celebrity Endorsed Supplements - Consumer Reports

In the echo chamber of the Internet, all it takes is one random tweet—or a Photoshop job—to turn a rumor into an absolute fact. Or, at least, something that will be spread as fact all over your Facebook feed, in texts from your mom, and in awkward office small talk. Often, you can check the source, immediately discerning that PrincessBabyGirl isn't the most reliable source for, say, diet pills that also make your boobs bigger and your laugh lines nonexistent, but separating truth from BS gets a lot trickier when the source is your favorite celeb. Only the star in question has never said that—and has no ties or affiliation to the drug whatsoever. Further adding to the confusion, some sites will include the logos of reputable media outlets, like Today , Woman's Day and The New York Times , claiming the product has been featured there too.

Diet pills celebrity endorsers

Diet pills celebrity endorsers

Diet pills celebrity endorsers

Diet pills celebrity endorsers

Diet pills celebrity endorsers

I am sure that, like me, the minister welcomes the steps that Shona Robison outlined and the work that Alison Thewliss is doing to take these issues up with the. By Stefanie Diet pills celebrity endorsers. However, what we have heard today clearly shows that it is a serious emerging issue that merits our full attention. She is an Instagram influencer from Glasgow who came out against promoting weight-loss products, saying:. Weight loss. Social media companies should ban "damaging" celebrity-endorsed social media ads promoting weight loss aids, England's top doctor has said. As I said, I have Real amateur porn for free year-old daughter, so I see at first hand the pressure on young people to conform to a societal or social media definition of what is beautiful. Seeing celebrities who have tens of millions of followers on social media promoting appetite-suppressing products is a significant contributing factor to that harm.

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Celebs like Jennifer Fatal car crash vids may come to mind when you think of the Zone Diet pills celebrity endorsers, which maintains that changing the balance of the foods you eat mainly, adding protein to balance the carbs at every meal or snack will help you lose weight, reset your metabolismand ward off chronic health conditions like heart disease and diabetes. Third, there's no database on or certification process endorsfrs consult to determine what celebrities are officially endorsing. However, the company has used its website to expand its reach. Celebgity you scroll all the way to the bottom, a disclaimer endorses the footer states that: "The story depicted on this site and the person depicted in the story are not real unless stated otherwise. She says she accomplished this with the Atkins die celebrrity and workouts, however there are also rumours of cosmetic procedures. Leave a Reply Cancel reply. If a product Diet pills celebrity endorsers not list them or does not show the dosages then how will you know first that it is effective, and second that it will not cause you any harm. Currently, I. We called ehdorsers wrote to representatives of the following famous names Diet pills celebrity endorsers ask whether the person used the supplement they were plugging and how much they were paid. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Weight loss. Does he use it?

With the never-ending parade of images of thin celebrities on television, in movies, on magazine covers, and everywhere on the Internet, it is little wonder that so many Americans want similar body shapes.

  • In the echo chamber of the Internet, all it takes is one random tweet—or a Photoshop job—to turn a rumor into an absolute fact.
  • January 9, Blog Leave a comment.
  • Hollywood celebrities are well known for crazy routines to lose weight for new roles.
  • With the never-ending parade of images of thin celebrities on television, in movies, on magazine covers, and everywhere on the Internet, it is little wonder that so many Americans want similar body shapes.

These are external links and will open in a new window. Social media companies should ban "damaging" celebrity-endorsed social media ads promoting weight loss aids, England's top doctor has said. Some celebrities with large followings are promoting products such as diet pills and detox teas on social media. Prof Stephen Powis, NHS medical director, argues these products have a damaging effect on the physical and mental health of young people.

Some influential celebrities have promoted weight loss aids for payment on social media, and this type of advertising is growing as brands realise how influential their posts are with young people. The Competition and Markets Authority recently announced a clampdown on celebrities who do not clearly label their posts as being paid-for advertisements, but there are few rules around what they can promote.

NHS England's national mental health director Claire Murdoch told BBC Breakfast that the intention was not to "suppress business or comment on what good business looks like". However, she expressed concern over the influence these celebrities had over young people at an "impressionable" stage in their lives. Kim Kardashian West, who has million followers on Instagram, was criticised for advertising appetite-suppressing lollypops last year. She later deleted the post. Katie Price 1.

Actress Jameela Jamil, who campaigns for body positivity, has described Kardashian West as a "terrible and toxic influence on young girls", and a meal replacement shake as "laxative teas.

Ms Jamil is the founder of the I Weigh social media campaign on Twitter and Instagram - where she encourages women to measure their value beyond their weight and looks. Research from the National Citizens Service shows that at least one in four young people say that their appearance was the most important thing to them, with over half of girls feeling the pressure to be thinner, and a third of boys thinking they should be more muscular.

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi led jihadists who carried out atrocities that resulted in thousands of deaths. Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Kim Kardashian West has promoted diet aids on social media Social media companies should ban "damaging" celebrity-endorsed social media ads promoting weight loss aids, England's top doctor has said. He is also urging influential celebrities to act "responsibly".

Prof Powis said: "If a product sounds like it is too good to be true, then it probably is. Elsewhere on the BBC. Tunnel 29 An extraordinary true story beneath the Berlin Wall. Why you can trust BBC News. Politics Home Parliaments Brexit.

Please call Member Services at Kate Middleton and Prince William had a marriage pact long before their wedding Cosmo. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. After two weeks of using Slim Quick Keto , I started the week off with even more energy and was actually sleeping more soundly than before. Your primary care physician can review any health conditions you have and medications you are taking, and then give personal guidance for a diet that might work for you. Choose from cars, safety, health, and more! For example, look at how many retweets this tweet got:.

Diet pills celebrity endorsers

Diet pills celebrity endorsers

Diet pills celebrity endorsers

Diet pills celebrity endorsers. Send this info to a friend

Gifford decried the complaints, saying critics should go after the sweatshops, not her, according to eonline. Sure, companies love their celebrities when regular people like you and me buy their products.

The love turns cold when the celebrity does something to fall out of favor — like getting arrested. The beverage company is no stranger to controversy with its celebrity endorsers. The supermodel lost millions in endorsement contracts after British tabloids printed photos of her apparently snorting cocaine. After sponsoring the cycling great for more than a decade, Nike called it quits with Armstrong this fall after a report detailed allegations of doping. Despite accusations throughout his career, Armstrong denied cheating and pointed to clean drug tests, said the L.

After it released the report, the U. Anti-Doping Agency stripped Armstrong of his seven Tour de France wins and banned him from competition. Nike has been known to hang in there with its tarnished stars — the company stood by Tiger Woods. View this article on MoneyTalksNews. No matching results for ''. Tip: Try a valid symbol or a specific company name for relevant results. Finance Home. Markets closed. Linda Doell. Money Talks News December 28, Kate Moss and Chanel The supermodel lost millions in endorsement contracts after British tabloids printed photos of her apparently snorting cocaine.

Story continues. Lance Armstrong and Nike After sponsoring the cycling great for more than a decade, Nike called it quits with Armstrong this fall after a report detailed allegations of doping. For example, look at how many retweets this tweet got:. Third, there's no database on or certification process to consult to determine what celebrities are officially endorsing.

You can't double-check whether a celebrity actually lent or rented his or her face, body or reputation to a product or service. Most of all, remember, Hollywood is Hollywood. Not everything is real. Sometimes that's a good thing.

Sometimes not so much. I am a writer, journalist, professor, systems modeler, computational and digital health expert, avocado-eater, and entrepreneur, not always in that order. Currently, I. Bruce Y. Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin.

Currently, I

Spotting Fake Celebrity Endorsements Of Diet And Health Remedies

Alert me about debates like this. The debate will be concluded without any question being put. I thank the many MSPs across the chamber who have added their names to my motion. It shows that the issue and, importantly, the need to confront it has overwhelming support from across this Parliament.

It has already gained more than 7, signatures and was organised by the founder of the empowered women project, Mandy Jones , whom I welcome to Parliament, along with others. We all know the pressures that young people, particularly girls and women, face these days to look good or have the perfect body, and the damaging effect that that can have on their mental wellbeing. As the mum of a year-old daughter, I know that very well.

The Office for National Statistics reported that young people who describe themselves as relatively unhappy with their appearance report higher levels of behavioural and emotional difficulties than those who are relatively happy with their appearance. In Scotland, the health behaviour in school-aged children survey found that at the age of 15 more than half of girls described themselves as too fat.

According to Wellbeing Works, Dundee, that perception makes them incredibly vulnerable to the kind of irresponsible and false advertising that promotes speedy weight loss.

A lot of the time, that advertising uses influencers or celebrities to get its message across and it is put out across social media to target specific audiences. The adverts are generally accompanied by before and after photos, often taken on the same day, giving an inaccurate portrayal of the effect of the advertised product.

Examples of that type of advert that have then been banned are not hard to find. One for Flat Tummy Tea that appeared on Instagram with before and after photos was banned for the misleading health claims that it made, while others have been banned on the ground of social irresponsibility for promoting unhealthy body images. I recognise the work that the Advertising Standards Authority does in investigating those types of adverts, but I would like further restrictions to be introduced and for the ASA to take a more proactive role in policing that type of advertising.

To that end, I have been working closely with my colleague Alison Thewliss MP , because the role of the ASA is reserved, to see how we can further highlight the issues and work with the ASA to combat them.

I met the ASA recently and I know that it would like to do more. One of the outcomes of the meeting was an agreement that my office would collect and compile a dossier of examples of that type of advert to pass on to the ASA for further investigation. I urge my fellow MSPs and the public to get in touch with me with any examples of adverts that they have concerns about and we will take them forward.

I would like celebrities and others to understand the influence that they can have on younger people and, ultimately, for them to stop endorsing those unhealthy and damaging weight-loss products. They need to realise the negative impact of their endorsements, as Lucinda Evelyn did. She is an Instagram influencer from Glasgow who came out against promoting weight-loss products, saying:. The plan highlighted the need to. I hope that, rather than contributing to the problem, celebrities will help to promote that vision.

I understand that the Scottish Government will soon publish research that explores the reported worsening of mental wellbeing among adolescent girls in Scotland, to which body image and social media appear to be large contributing factors.

Perhaps in her reply, the minister could outline what action the Scottish Government might take as a result of the research. Although the Advertising Standards Authority, Governments and, ultimately, celebrities and influencers have their part to play, social media companies need to take more responsibility for the content that is advertised on their platforms. Unfortunately, I am still waiting on a response from Facebook and Instagram.

I would like those companies to be more proactive and socially responsible in dealing with such advertising, and I invite them to let us know what action they will take to address those issues. We all need to work together if we are to tackle the issues effectively. I would also like to use the debate to enable a wider discussion on the societal pressures on young people and adults to obtain Instagram-worthy lives and the impact that that is having on mental health.

As I said, I have a year-old daughter, so I see at first hand the pressure on young people to conform to a societal or social media definition of what is beautiful. I am sure that we can all relate to that. I hope that the debate will contribute to achieving that aim and will serve as a call to address the issues.

I congratulate my colleague Shona Robison on bringing this important topic to the chamber, and Mandy Jones , the founder of the empowered women project, on her petition calling on the Advertising Standards Authority to better regulate social media influencers. Celebrity endorsements are almost as old as advertising itself, but in recent years there has been a worrying rise in the number of celebrities endorsing diet or weight-loss products, particularly online. Such adverts are not on the sides of buses or in magazines; instead, they populate the lnstagram feeds of the rich and famous.

Behind the glamorous photos lies an ugly reality: many such products are simply laxatives or diuretics that might cause cramping, stomach pains, diarrhoea and dehydration. Instead, we see glossy adverts by paid celebrities and influencers who have no expertise or authority in nutrition, medicine or human biology. Some online celebrities have shared their experiences of predatory companies. One such celebrity, with , Twitter followers and , Instagram followers, said:.

They never stipulate that I need to use the product, they just want me to post a pretty picture and imply that I look good because of their poisonous tea. What is particularly galling about the practice is that the wealthy celebrities who promote the products might never have even sampled them, and can thank their personal trainer, nutritionist or plastic surgeon, or Photoshop, for the public physique that their followers hope to emulate.

That false and irresponsible advertising is part of a pervasive and disturbing rhetoric that preys on eating-disordered behaviour and often exploits young, naive and vulnerable consumers who may not understand the health implications of using diet products. Last year, people were treated for an eating disorder in Scotland, and their recovery is threatened by reckless advertising practices.

Science tells us that quick-fix weight loss is never the answer and that the risks far outweigh any perceived benefits. As the old saying goes, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Doctors are now asking that the unethical advertising practice of celebrity ads for diet aids be banned by social media companies. The ASA now takes complaints against celebrity diet endorsements seriously.

In one photograph, she is seen with a bloated belly and a high ponytail; in the next photo, her weight and hair are down. The caption reads:. The excuses are in the past, much like the water weight I used to have. The damage had already been done.

It is therefore incumbent on platforms such as lnstagram, Twitter and Facebook to police the kind of paid promotion that is permitted on their apps. In the terms of use, Instagram users are asked to agree to foster. The promotion of potentially dangerous diet products quite clearly flies in the face of that, and Instagram must do more to protect its users. One would also hope that celebrities would consider the potential impact on impressionable people before accepting payment for such endorsements.

I again thank Shona Robison and hope that the issues raised in her motion are incorporated into those plans in order to diminish the disingenuous and dangerous marketing of harmful diet products. The Deputy Presiding Officer :. I note the applause from the gallery. I understand why people might do it, but we do not permit the public to applaud during a debate. I am really thankful to Shona Robison for securing this important debate, and I, too, thank Mandy Jones , the founder of the empowered woman project, for submitting her petition.

Of course, it is not just women who are affected by this, but speaking as a woman, I am only too aware of the pressures that we face to look a certain way. In the past, I have succumbed to diet products that promised me the world but left me disappointed, and I am sure that I am not the only person in this place to have bought meal replacement milkshakes and celebrity fitness videos. However, I see the hidden pressures that are faced by young people, and the peer-led advertisements on social media with which teenagers are continually being bombarded and which are more discreet than traditional television advertising.

Sometimes they are for products that encourage rapid weight loss and which, as a result, potentially create unrealistic body expectations and low self-esteem. It is absolutely right that we tackle this issue together and call out a practice that has hidden dangers for the mental health of an entire generation of women.

As much as I like to think of myself as being young, I am not the target market for these celebrity endorsements. I do not watch much reality TV , I do not really use Instagram and I have reached an age at which I am cynical enough to recognise false promises.

However, the scary thing is that this sort of advertising is very much targeted at young people and predominantly young women. If we bear in mind how often we are on our phones these days, it is hardly surprising that this has become a lucrative business.

According to the experts, diet supplements pose a risk to health. Detox teas and weight-loss coffees are among the products that in recent years have surged in popularity due to celebrity endorsements.

However, the same products are often not endorsed by official bodies, so we cannot say what has or has not been medically approved. As we have heard, some products have come under fire for not clearly advertising that they contain laxatives, and even those that do not contain laxatives often contain diuretics that can cause dehydration, diarrhoea and fluid loss followed by fluid regain. Often they are sold on the basis that they should be taken continually over a certain period of time, but without much guidance on what people should be eating.

Such products are sold by celebrities who are approached by companies because of their popularity and following on social media. What makes that all the more concerning is that the companies wish to benefit from the relationship between celebrity and fan—a relationship that is based on trust and adoration.

I admit that, until I started writing my speech for the debate, I had not heard of most of the products that have been referred to. To get a better understanding, I asked a young member of my team to show me some of the celebrity accounts that push such products, and I was shocked by how image focused the posts are and how difficult it would be for most people to obtain a similar physique.

More to the point, I can understand how, when bombarded by such images, those who are exposed forget that it is possible to be a healthy weight without looking like their favourite celebrity. I again thank Mandy Jones for her hard work on the campaign. As so many children and young people are affected by mental health issues, it makes absolutely no sense for images and products that we know to be potentially harmful to be promoted simply to line the pockets of a few individuals.

I believe that social media companies and celebrities have a greater role to play, and I hope that the debate will spark a wider discussion on this important topic. I thank Shona Robison for securing this important debate and I pay tribute to Mandy Jones for highlighting the issue, which is important. Social media can be a positive platform and, used responsibly, it can change society for the better.

Personally, I find social media to be a useful tool to promote campaigns, such as those spreading period positive messages, and to bring together wonderful campaigners. However, there is a very ugly side of social media that involves people spreading hate speech and the trolls who viciously target others, often with little action from Twitter or Facebook, which in my experience do not often reply even to politicians. Young social media users are exposed to the good and the bad. Young people such as my year-old daughter now have greater access than ever to the celebrities who they admire.

Young people look up to their heroes and want to be a little bit like them. However, shockingly, those everyday product endorsements have, as we have heard, become something far more sinister, especially through social media. Weight-loss products are being marketed to our young people in a damaging and entirely unethical way.

As well as the fact that the products are untried and untested by the celebrity endorsers, the claims about the results that they bring are completely misleading. Maintaining a healthy weight is important and, for most of us, it can be achieved by a good diet and exercise. However, these products falsely promise a quick fix.

As Shona Robison explained, before and after photographs are often taken on the same day, but with slightly different lighting, so they are entirely fake. Young people are parting with their pocket money or hard-earned cash for nothing more than magic beans.

Like other members, I am extremely concerned about the potential harm to health.

Diet pills celebrity endorsers

Diet pills celebrity endorsers